Wednesday, March 8, 2017

{solsc} 8/31 #sol17 A Last I Will Not Miss

My last Iowa Assessments. My shoes squeak as I walk about the room, making sure everyone bubbles in on the right test. As juniors, they know the drill. They've been joking about making Christmas trees, about not really reading and just guessing. Most won't do any of this, but they can joke about it.

I think back to my own days of bubble testing. I was in second grade the first time I felt like I wasn't smart enough. We got our test scores back. I was in the 98th percentile overall, but a boy, the one I always tried to be better than, got a 99.  Why didn't anyone tell me I was better than my test score?

Throughout my teaching, I have always tried to convince students of this. But it's hard today to convince them they are more than their test score when one of the final things I have to say is, "You must be proficient in the areas of reading, science and math in order to take concurrent classes at the college. If you aren't proficient in reading, you may be required to additional reading classes."

I get it. I do.

But this is a "last" that I will not miss.

11 comments:

  1. I can't imagine who would miss preparing and proctoring these tests.

    Thanks for ensuring that your kids know they are so much more than a test score.

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  2. "Why didn't anyone tell me I was better than my test score?"
    God how I wish everyone knew how true this is. I suffered all of my academic life because my grades were low and thats how I thought people viewed me, as my low and disappointing grades. Keep on spreading this message!

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  3. "But this is a last I will not miss." Amen! Unfortunately, I've been roped into helping with testing the past two years after retirement, but this year I'll be playing Granny Nanny to my new grandson, so no testing for me.

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  4. I never had to give those tests, but had to support my own children through them. I'm sure you won't miss them at all, Deb. Sad for so many children.

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  5. What a shame that tests - and DATA - have become so important. This line says it all - "Why didn't anyone tell me I was better than my test score?" Why doesn't someone tell administrators and central office personnel and state department leaders this? That is all they seem to value these days.

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  6. How can one day on one test tell give a true picture? Nope, don't miss those tests at all.

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  7. Ugh - testing week at our school, too. Glad you won't need to pace and monitor and be bothered by these pesky asssessments any longer!

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  8. I don't think we'll ever know the lasting effects test scores can have on our students, especially in this high stakes environment we now all live inside. Happy for you that this is a last, as I find nothing less joyful than standardized testing. Great point about being "more than a test score!"

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  9. I don't think we'll ever know the lasting effects test scores can have on our students, especially in this high stakes environment we now all live inside. Happy for you that this is a last, as I find nothing less joyful than standardized testing. Great point about being "more than a test score!"

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  10. Oh, my. Testing makes me so sad. Yes, we and our students are better than the test scores.

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